A merging of global mobile styles

Though Antoine Wright doesn't know all the details of what will happen to mobility in the future, he does know that it is changing daily communications on a global-made-local level.

Though Antoine Wright doesn't know all the details of what will happen to mobility in the future, what he does know is that it is changing daily communications on a global-made-local level.

There's something about learning how other cultures use technology, specifically mobile technology, that really amazes me. Mobile tech has a mash of personal and social effects that galvanizes and separates so easily. Not that it should be surprising, but just knowing how others use their phones makes for good reading, and a fair bit of ideas on how those of us in the U.S. can take take mobile tech a bit "over the edge."

For example, many of us are familiar with the fact that citizens of Japan and South Korea are mobile "fanatics." There are so many subcultures that are mobile-driven or mobile-influenced that I find it pretty amazing. Recent reports say such things as high school girls in Japan spend on average 2 hours on their mobile devices a day. That can include mobile Web, but it's mainly SMS. It can include the hours they're in school too. Incredible.

And then there are stories that cover how the publishing industries in Japan and South Korea are bolstered by authors who compose their entire works on mobile devices, and then send them via SMS and mobile Internet to the publishing houses for critiquing and pre-publishing.

There are also places such as Pakistan which is in the midst of deploying WiMax throughout the entire country. Whole industries and ways of life will now be merged with a wireless capability that did not exist before. I can imagine that moofing (mobile-out-of-office working) will be something that becomes more of a way of life there.

It would seem that adding mobile to our lives promotes this type of merging and mixing of styles that was not possible before. And this is OK. As a matter of fact, it's pretty neat.

I wonder how many more generations of users will take this merging and make something new out of it. But then what will that mean for the older ways of doing things? Will the merging of print and Web with QR-Codes demote writing, or will it enhance its importance?

Truth be told, I don't know what will happen. Though I am enjoying parts of what is going on. It's mobile -- and we are on the cusp of something pretty neat. And to see these sights, I don't think I'll need to travel far to be in the mix with it.

This was last published in February 2008

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