Data and infrastructure Definitions

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  • M

    myoelectric signal (motor action potential)

    A myoelectric signal, also called a motor action potential, is an electrical impulse that produces contraction of muscle fibers in the body.

  • N

    Nickel-Cadmium battery (Ni-Cd or NiCd)

    The Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery is a type of battery commonly used in portable computers, camcorders, portable drills, and other small battery-powered devices, having an effective and even power discharge.

  • Nickel-Metal Hydride battery (Ni-MH or NiMH)

    The Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) battery is a rechargeable power source that is increasingly used in portable computers and other devices.

  • NOAA Weather Radio (NWR)

    NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) is an emergency broadcasting system operated by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA, pronounced NO-ah).

  • O

    Open Handset Alliance (OHA)

    The Open Handset Alliance (OHA) is a coalition of more than 30 technology and mobile companies that introduced Android, an open source mobile phone operating system. (Continued...)

  • optical wireless

    Optical wireless refers to the conbined use of two technologies - conventional radio-frequency (RF) wireless and optical fiber - for telecommunication.

  • Over the Air (OTA)

    Over The Air (OTA) (or Over-The-Air) is a standard for the transmission and reception of application-related information in a wireless communications system.

  • P

    PC-DOS (Personal Computer - Disk Operating System)

    Also see DOS. PC-DOS (Personal Computer - Disk Operating System) was the first widely-installed operating system used in personal computers.

  • Pentium 4 (P4)

    Pentium 4 (P4) is the Intel processor (codenamed Willamette) that was released in November 2000. The P4 processor has a viable clock speed that now exceeds 2 gigahertz (GHz) - as compared to the 1 GHz of the Pentium 3. P4 had the first totally new chip architecture since the 1995 Pentium Pro.

  • peripheral

    A peripheral (pronounced peh-RIHF-uh-ruhl, a noun truncation of peripheral device, ) is any computer device that is not part of the essential computer (the processor, memory, and data paths) but is situated relatively close by.

  • processor serial number (PSN)

    A PSN (processor serial number) is a software-readable unique serial number that Intel has stamped into its Pentium 3 microprocessor.

  • public land mobile network (PLMN)

    (pu A public land mobile network (PLMN) is any wireless communications system intended for use by terrestrial subscribers in vehicles or on foot.

  • Q

    Quarter Video Graphics Array (QVGA)

    QVGA (Quarter Video Graphics Array) is a small-screen display mode in which the resolution is 320 pixels horizontally by 240 pixels vertically (320 x 240). This is 25 percent of the total number of pixels afforded by the VGA (Video Graphics Array) display mode originally introduced by IBM in 1987... (Continued)

  • R

    radio charging

    Radio charging is a wireless charging method used to charge items with small batteries and low power requirements, such as watches, hearing aids and wireless keyboards and mice... (Continued)

  • Radio Data System (RDS)

  • remote wakeup (RWU)

    Remote wakeup (RWU) is a general term for the powering-up of (turning on) a computer over a network.

  • resonance charging

    Resonance charging is a wireless charging method for items that require large amounts of power, such as an electric car, robot, vacuum cleaner or laptop computer. The method works over small distances (3-5 meters)... (Continued)

  • roaming service

    Roaming service is the ability to get access to the Internet when away from home at the price of a local call or at a charge considerably less than the regular long-distance charges.

  • S

    searching

    On the Internet, searching is just trying to find the information you need. (Continued...)

  • service set identifier (SSID)

    A service set identifier (SSID) is a sequence of characters that uniquely names a wireless local area network (WLAN)... (Continued)

  • short message

    A short message is a brief text message sent to or from a mobile phone subscriber through the Short Message Service (SMS).

  • Short Message Service (SMS)

    SMS (Short Message Service) is a service for sending short messages of up to 160 characters (224 characters if using a 5-bit mode) to mobile devices, including cell phones, smart phones and PDAs... (Continued)

  • short message service center (SMSC)

    A short message service center (SMSC) is the portion of a wireless network that handles SMS operations, such as routing, forwarding and storing incoming text messages on their way to desired endpoints...(Continued)

  • SIM card

    A SIM card, also known as a subscriber identity module, is a smart card that stores identification information that pinpoints a smartphone to a specific mobile network.

  • SIMO (single input, multiple output)

    SIMO (single input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the destination (receiver).

  • single stream 802.11n

    Single-stream 802.11n takes advantage of the fact that the second draft of the 802.11n specification does not require the number of antennas on the sending station to be equal to the number on the receiving station.

  • SISO (single input, single output)

    SISO (single input, single output) refers to a wireless communications system in which one antenna is used at the source (transmitter) and one antenna is used at the destination (receiver).

  • smartphone

    A smartphone is a cellular telephone with an integrated computer and other features not originally associated with telephones, such as an operating system, web browsing and the ability to run software applications.

  • SMS gateway

    An SMS gateway is a website that allows users to send SMS messages from a web browser to people within the cell served by that gateway. An SMS gateway can also serve as an international gateway for users with roaming capability, allowing SMS communication away from the home network.

  • sniff subrating

    Sniff subrating is a Bluetooth feature designed to increase battery life as much as 500 percent for devices whose typical usage involves a significant amount of inactive time... (Continued)

  • soft handoff

    In cellular telephone communication, soft handoff refers to the overlapping of repeater coverage zones, so that every cell phone set is always well within range of at least one repeater (also called a base station).

  • Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR)

    Also see Enhanced Specialized Mobile Radio (ESMR).

  • spectrum efficiency

    Spectrum efficiency is the optimized use of spectrum or bandwidth so that the maximum amount of data can be transmitted with the fewest transmission errors.

  • Square (Square Register, Square Wallet)

    Square is a mobile payment startup co-founded in 2009 by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey. Square’s first product, Square Register, allows registered members to accept debit and credit card payments on mobile devices by using the Square Reader, a small card-swipe dongle that plugs into the device's audio jack.

  • Sugar

    Sugar is a graphical user interface GUI developed for the $100 laptop (XO)... (Continued)

  • SWAN (Structured Wireless-Aware Network)

    SWAN (Structured Wireless-Aware Network) is a technology that incorporates a wireless local area network (wireless LAN or WLAN) into a wired wide-area network.

  • swirl

  • T

    TD-SCDMA (time division synchronous code division multiple access)

    TD-SCDMA (time division synchronous code division multiple access) is a mobile telephone standard for wireless network operators who want to move from a second generation (2G) wireless network to a third-generation (3G) one. Supporting data transmission at speeds up to 2 Mbps, TD-SCDMA combines support for both circuit-switched data, such as speech or video, and also packet-switched data from the Internet.

  • telecommuting

    Telecommuting is an arrangement to work outside the traditional office or workplace, usually at home or in a mobile situation.

  • text messaging (texting or wireless messaging)

    Text messaging is the act of sending short, alphanumeric communications between cellphones, pagers or other hand-held devices, as implemented by a wireless carrier.

  • TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol)

    TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) is an encryption protocol included as part of the IEEE 802.11i standard for wireless LANs (WLANs).

  • toothing (Bluetoothing)

    Toothing (sometimes called Bluetoothing) is the practice of contacting strangers via a Bluetooth wireless connection to flirt.

  • U

    UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service)

    UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service) is a third-generation (3G) broadband, packet-based transmission of text, digitized voice, video, and multimedia at data rates up to 2 megabits per second (Mbps). UMTS offers a consistent set of services to mobile computer and phone users, no matter where they are located in the world. Based on the Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication standard, UMTS is endorsed by major standards bodies and manufacturers and is the planned standard for mobile users around the world.

  • unified messaging (unified messaging system or UMS)

    Unified messaging (sometimes referred to as the unified messaging system or UMS) is the handling of voice, fax, and regular text messages as objects in a single mailbox that a user can access either with a regular e-mail client or by telephone.

  • V

    VMware Horizon Mobile

    VMware Horizon Mobile is mobile virtualization and application wrapping software that lets IT administrators control corporate data and applications on end users' smartphones and tablets.

  • voice portal (vortal)

    A voice portal (sometimes called a vortal) is a Web portal that can be accessed entirely by voice.

  • VoWLAN (Voice over WLAN)

    VoWLAN (Voice over WLAN) is a method of sending voice information in digital form over a wireless broadband network. The technology is sometimes called "VoWi-Fi" or "Wi-Fi VoIP" because it uses the IEEE 802.11 set of specifications (informally known as "Wi-Fi") for transporting data over wireless local area networks and the Internet. Essentially, VoWLAN is VoIP delivered through wireless technology.

  • W

    W-CDMA (Wideband Code-Division Multiple Access)

    Also see CDMA, CDMA One, and CDMA2000. W-CDMA (Wideband Code-Division Multiple Access), an ITU standard derived from Code-Division Multiple Access (CDMA), is officially known as IMT-2000 direct spread.

  • WAP (Wireless Application Protocol)

    WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) is a specification for a set of communication protocols to standardize the way that wireless devices, such as cellular telephones and radio transceivers, can be used for Internet access.

  • watchdog timer (WDT)

    A watchdog timer (WDT) is a device or electronic card that performs a specific operation after a certain period of time if something goes wrong with an electronic system and the system does not recover on its own.

  • Web texting

    Web texting is two-way text messaging from the Web to a handheld mobile device, usually a cellular phone.

  • WhatsApp

    WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform instant messaging application that allows iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia smartphone users to exchange text, image, video and audio messages for free. 

  • whip antenna

    A whip antenna is a single-element antenna that can be used with anunbalanced feed line such as coaxial cable,or attached directly to a wirelesstransmitter, receiver, or transceiver.

  • Wi-Fi (802.11x standard)

    Wi-Fi is the popular term for high-frequency wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and a standard that has gained acceptance in many companies as an alternative to a wired LAN.

  • Wi-Fi range extender (range expander)

    A Wi-Fi range extender, sometimes called a range expander, is a type of wireless repeater used to expand the reach of a wireless LAN. The device is situated in between a base router or access point and a client that is not close enough to receive acceptable service or one that is on the other side of a barrier.

  • Wibree (Baby Bluetooth)

    Wibree, also called Baby Bluetooth, is a low-power wireless local area network (WLAN) technology that facilitates interoperability among mobile and portable consumer devices such as pagers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), wireless computer peripherals, entertainment devices and medical equipment... (Continued)

  • wireless

    Wireless is a term used to describe telecommunications in which electromagnetic waves (rather than some form of wire) carry the signal over part or all of the communication path.

  • wireless backhaul

    Wireless backhaul is the use of wireless communications systems to get data from an end user to a node in a major network such as the Internet or the proprietary network of a large business, academic institution or government agency... (Continued)

  • Wireless Bitmap (WBMP)

    A Wireless Bitmap (WBMP) is a graphic image format for use when sending Web content to handheld wireless devices.

  • wireless broadband (WiBB)

    Wireless broadband is high-speed Internet and data service delivered through a wireless local area network (WLAN) or wide area network (WWAN).

  • wireless charging

    Wireless charging is any of several methods of charging batteries without the use of cables. The three main methods of wireless charging are radio charging, resonance charging and inductive charging... (Continued)

  • wireless distribution system (WDS)

    A wireless distribution system (WDS) is a method of interconnecting access points (AP) in a wireless local area network (WLAN). WDS makes it possible to expand the network range without requiring that access points connect through a wired backbone.

  • wireless ISP (wireless Internet service provider or WISP)

    A wireless Internet service provider (WISP) is an Internet service provider (ISP) that allows subscribers to connect to a server at designated hot spots (access points) using a wireless connection such as Wi-Fi.

  • wireless number portability

    Wireless number portability is the ability of a mobile customer to retain the same phone number when they switch carriers; wireline-to-wireless number portability allows customers to switch from their landline telephone service to a wireless provider while retaining the same telephone number.

  • Y

    Yagi antenna (Yagi-Uda array)

    A Yagi antenna, also known as a Yagi-Uda array or simply a Yagi, is a unidirectional antenna commonly used in communications when a frequency is above 10 MHz.

  • Z

    Zimbra Collaboration Server

    Zimbra is an open source server and client technology for enterprise messaging and collaboration.

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