Data and infrastructure Definitions

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  • #

    4G (fourth-generation wireless)

    4G is the short term for fourth-generation wireless, the stage of broadband mobile communications that will supercede the third generation (3G) of wireless communications....(Continued)

  • 802.11

    802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)....(Continued)

  • 802.11b

    The 802.11b standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) - often called Wi-Fi - is part of the 802.11 series of WLAN standards from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • 802.11d

    802.11d is a communications specification for use in countries where systems using other standards in the 802.11 family are not allowed to operate.

  • 802.11e

    802.11e is a proposed enhancement to the 802.11a and 802.11b wireless LAN (WLAN) specifications.

  • 802.11g

    The 802.11g specification is a standard for wireless local area networks WLANs) that offers wireless transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps), compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum with the earlier 802.11b standard.

  • 802.11h

    The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.11 family of standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs). 802.11h is intended to resolve interference issues introduced by the use of 802.11a in some locations, particularly with military radar systems.

  • 802.11i

    802.11i is a standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) that provides improved encryption for networks that use the popular 802.11a and 802.11b (which includes Wi-Fi standards).

  • 802.11j

    The 802.11j specification is a proposed addition to the 802.11 family of standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs) that incorporates Japenese regulatory extensions to the 802.11a standard.

  • 802.11k

    802.11k is a proposed standard for a series of measurement requests and reports involving channel selection, roaming, transmit power control (TPC), and subscriber statistics in 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs).

  • 802.11m

    802.11m is an initiative to perform editorial maintenance, corrections, improvements, clarifications, and interpretations relevant to documentation for 802.11 family specifications.

  • 802.11n

    802.11n is an addition to the 802.11 family of standards. The goal of 802.11n is to increase wireless local area network (WLAN) speed, improve reliability and extend the range of wireless transmissions. 802.11n uses multiple input / multiple output (MIMO) technology and a wider radio frequency channel.

  • 802.11x

    802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.11 family of specifications, but that have not yet been formally approved or deployed.

  • 802.15

    802.15 is a communications specification that was approved in early 2002 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) for wireless personal area networks (WPANs).

  • 802.16

    802.16 is a group of broadband wireless communications standards for metropolitan area networks (MANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • 802.16a

    802.16a is a wireless communications specification for metropolitan area networks (MANs).

  • 802.16c

    802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.16 family of wireless communications specifications for metropolitan area networks (MANs).

  • 802.1X

    The 802.1X standard is designed to enhance the security of wireless local area networks (WLANs) that follow the IEEE 802.11 standard.

  • A

    Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP)

    Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) is an interface specification that enables 3-D graphics to display quickly on ordinary personal computers.

  • Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS)

    Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) is a standard system for analog signal cellular telephone service in the United States and is also used in other countries. It is based on the initial electromagnetic radiation spectrum allocation for cellular service by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1970. Introduced by AT&T in 1983, AMPS became one of the most widely deployed cellular system in the United States. (Continued...)

  • air interface

    In cellular telephone communications, the air interface is the radio-frequency portion of the circuit between the cellular phone set or wireless modem (usually portable or mobile) and the active base station.

  • amateur radio (ham radio)

    Amateur radio, also known as ham radio, is a hobby enjoyed by several hundred thousand people in the United States and by over a million people worldwide.

  • Android Beam

    Android Beam is a Near Field Communication implementation that allows two Android mobile devices to transfer data between each other.

  • antenna

    An antenna is a specialized transducer that converts radio-frequency (RF) fields into alternating current (AC) or vice-versa.

  • Asia Cellular Satellite System (ACeS)

    Asia Cellular Satellite System(ACeS) is a combined cellular telephone and satellite wireless system from Ericsson that provides digital communication service to mobile phone and computer users in the Asia Pacific Region.

  • B

    battery

    A battery is an electrochemical cell (or enclosed and protected material) that can be charged electrically to provide a static potential for power or released electrical charge when needed.

  • Bluetooth 4.0

    Bluetooth 4.0 is a version of the Bluetooth wireless networking standard that consumes less power than its predecessors.

  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP)

    The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas. BTOP, which will disburse $4.7 billion in a number of categories, is expected to create jobs, advance technology and boost the economy.

  • C

    CDMA One (cdmaOne or code-division multiple access one)

    Also see CDMA, WCDMA, and CDMA2000. CDMA One, also written cdmaOne, refers to the original ITU IS-95 (CDMA) wireless interface protocol that was first standardized in 1993. It is considered a second-generation (2G) mobile wireless technology.

  • CDMA2000 (IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or code-division multiple access 2000)

    CDMA2000, also known as IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or 1xRTT, is a code-division multiple access (CDMA) version of the IMT-2000 standard developed by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

  • cell

    In wireless telephony, a cell is the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter.

  • cell breathing

    Cell breathing is the constant change of the range of the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter based on the amount of traffic currently using that transmitter.

  • coaxial antenna

    A coaxial antenna is a variant of the dipole antenna, designed for use with an unbalanced feed line.

  • Complementary Code Keying (CCK)

    Complementary Code Keying (CCK) is a modulation scheme used with wireless networks (WLANs) that employ the IEEE 802.11b specification.

  • CSD (circuit switched data)

    Circuit switched data (CSD) was the original form of data transmission developed for TDMA-based networks, typically obtaining speeds up to 9.6 Kbps.

  • D

    datacard

    A datacard is any removable computer component, approximately the size of a credit card, that contains data, or that contains nonvolatile memory to which data can be written and from which data can be recovered.

  • decibels related to dipole antenna (dBd)

    dBd (decibels related to dipole antenna) is a measure of the gain of an antenna system relative to a dipole antenna at radio frequency.

  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB)

  • digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB)

    Digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB) is the process of multicasting by satellite or terrestrial services (or a combination of both) for reception by mobile and portable devices, particularly cell phones... (Continued)

  • Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB)

    Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a set of standards that define digital broadcasting using existing satellite, cable, and terrestrial infrastructures.

  • dipole antenna

    A dipole antenna is a straight electrical conductor measuring 1/2 wavelength from end to end and connected at the center to a radio-frequency (RF) feed line.

  • dish antenna

    A dish antenna, also known simply as a dish, is common in microwave systems.

  • distributed antenna system (DAS)

    A distributed antenna system (DAS) is a way to deal with isolated spots of poor coverage inside a large building by installing a network of relatively small antennas throughout the building to serve as repeaters.

  • downlink and uplink

    These terms should not be confused with downstream and upstream.

  • E

    EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment)

    EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment) is a faster version of GSM designed to deliver data at rates up to 384 Kbps and enable the delivery of multimedia and other broadband applications to mobile phone and computer users.

  • EFSS (Enterprise file sync-and-share)

    Enterprise file sync-and-share is a service that allows users to save files in cloud or on-premises storage and then access them on desktop and mobile devices.

  • electromagnetic interference (EMI)

    EMI (electromagnetic interference) is the disruption of operation of an electronic device when it is in the vicinity of an electromagnetic field (EM field) in the radio frequency (RF) spectrum that is caused by another electronic device.

  • end-user computing (EUC)

    End-user computing (EUC) refers to the devices, applications and data that workers need to perform their jobs, and the technologies used to deploy, manage and secure those resources.

  • Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS)

    Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) is an adaptation of the Short Message Service (SMS) that allows users to send and receive ring tones and operator logos, as well as combinations of simple media to and from EMS-compliant handsets.

  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI)

    Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks... (Continued)

  • EUTELSAT (European Telecommunications Satellite Organization)

    EUTELSAT (European Telecommunications Satellite Organization) refers to both the organization and its set of satellites that were placed in geostationary orbits over Europe beginning in 1983. By early 1998, at least 48 countries had become members of EUTELSAT and the satellites were serving both public and private traffic, including telephone services, fax, data, land mobile service, and television and radio programming to home and business users with their own receivers.

  • EV-DO (1x Evolution-Data Optimized)

    1x Evolution-Data Optimized, (EV-DO) is a 3G wireless radio broadband data standard. (...Continued)

  • Evernote

    Evernote is a cloud-based note-taking and file-storage application that synchronizes data across multiple devices.

  • F

    FDMA (frequency division multiple access)

  • feed line

    In a wireless communications or broadcasting antenna system, the feed line connects the antenna to the receiver, transmitter, or transceiver.

  • fixed wireless

    Fixed wireless refers to the operation of wireless devices or systems in fixed locations such as homes and offices.

  • fixed-mobile convergence (FMC)

    Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) is the trend towards seamless connectivity between fixed and wireless telecommunications networks... (Continued)

  • fixed-mobile substitution (FMS)

    Fixed-mobile substitution (FMS) is the tendency for consumers and businesses to increasingly substitute cellular telephones for hard-wired or cordless landline sets... (Continued)

  • forward error correction (FEC)

    Forward error correction (FEC) is a method of obtaining error control in data transmission in which the source (transmitter) sends redundant data and the destination (receiver) recognizes only the portion of the data that contains no apparent errors.

  • G

    geostationary satellite

    A geostationary satellite is an earth-orbiting satellite, placed at an altitude of approximately 35,800 kilometers (22,300 miles) directly over the equator, that revolves in the same direction the earth rotates (west to east)...

  • Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology enables the user, through approximately 30 well-spaced, earth-orbiting satellites, to pinpoint one's geographic location through ground receivers and mobile devices.

  • Google Cloud Print

    Google Cloud Print is an online service that lets users print documents and other files from supported apps and mobile devices to any compatible printer.

  • Google Drive

    Google Drive is a free cloud-based storage service that enables users to store and access files online.

  • GPRS (General Packet Radio Services)

    General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) is a packet-based wireless communication service that promises data rates from 56 up to 114 Kbps and continuous connection to the Internet for mobile phone and computer users.

  • GPS messaging (Global Positioning System messaging or mid-air messaging)

    GPS (Global Positioning System) messaging is a wireless messaging system for location-specific rather than recipient-specific messages.

  • ground-plane antenna

    A ground-plane antenna is a variant of the dipole antenna, designed for use with an unbalanced feed line such as coaxial cable.

  • GSM (Global System for Mobile communication)

    GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) is a digital mobile network that is widely used by mobile phone users in Europe and other parts of the world.

  • H

    handoff

    In a cellular telephone network, handoff is the transition for any given user of signal transmission from one base station to a geographically adjacent base station as the user moves around.

  • helical antenna

    A helical antenna is a specialized antenna that emits and responds to electromagnetic fields with rotating (circular)polarization.

  • hertz

    Hertz is a unit of frequency (of change in state or cycle in a sound wave, alternating current, or other cyclical waveform) of one cycle per second.

  • Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6)

    Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) is the proposed enhancement of Mobile Internet Protocol versions 6 (MIPv6) that is designed to reduce the amount of signaling required and to improve handoffspeed for mobile connections.

  • HiperLAN

    MEO satellite"HiperLAN is a set of wireless local area network (WLAN) communication standards primarily used in European countries.

  • horn antenna

    A horn antenna is used for the transmission and reception of microwave signals.

  • HSDPA (High-Speed Downlink Packet Access)

    High-Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) is a packet-based mobile telephony protocol used in 3G UMTS radio networks. (...Continued)

  • HSPA (high speed packet access)

    HSPA (high speed packet access) is a third-generation (3G) mobile broadband communications technology.

  • I

    inductive charging

    Inductive charging is a wireless charging method used for charging mid-sized items such as cell phones, MP3 players and PDAs... (Continued)

  • instant app (Google Android instant app)

    A Google Android instant app is a small software program that enables end users to test out a portion of a native Android app without installing it on a device.

  • Intel Bay Trail

    Intel Bay Trail is the code name for a line of Atom processors manufactured by Intel Corp.

  • IR wireless (infrared wireless)

    IR wireless is the use of wireless technology in devices or systems that convey data through infrared (IR) radiation.

  • IrDA (Infrared Data Association)

    5IrDA (Infrared Data Association) is an industry-sponsored organization set up in 1993 to create international standards for the hardware and software used in infrared communication links.

  • L

    LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)

    LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate data such as organizations, individuals and other resources such as files and devices in a network -- whether on the public internet or on a corporate intranet.

  • Lemon Wallet

    Lemon Wallet is a digital wallet application that allows users to store digital copies of identification, insurance, loyalty and payment cards, providing a backup in case a physical wallet is lost, stolen or left at home.

  • Lithium Ion battery (Li-Ion)

    A Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) battery is a rechargeable battery with twice the energy capacity of a Nickel-Cadmium battery and greater stability and safety.

  • LTE (Long Term Evolution)

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a standard for 4G wireless broadband technology that offers increased network capacity and speed to mobile device users.

  • LTE-Advanced (Long Term Evolution-Advanced)

    Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-Advanced) is a cellular networking standard that offers higher throughput than its predecessor, the Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard.

  • M

    megachips per second (Mcps)

    Megachips per second (Mcps) is a measure of the speed with which encoding elements, called chips (not to be confused with microchips), are generated in Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) signals.

  • microwave integrated circuit (MIC)

    A microwave integrated circuit (MIC) is an integrated circuit (IC) designed for operation at frequencies of approximately 1 gigahertz (GHz) or more... (Continued)

  • MIMO (multiple input, multiple output)

    MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both the source (transmitter) and the destination (receiver).

  • MISO (multiple input, single output)

    MISO (multiple input, single output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at the source (transmitter).

  • mobile application processor

    A mobile application processor is a system on a chip (SoC) designed to support applications running in a mobile operating system environment such as Android, Apple iOS, Windows CE/Mobile or Symbian.

  • mobile backend as a service (mobile BaaS)

    Mobile backend as a service is a cloud computing architecture that provides mobile applications with the resources they need to run.

  • Mobile IP

    Mobile IP is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard communications protocol that is designed to allow mobile device users to move from one network to another while maintaining their permanent IP address.

  • Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6 or Mobile Internet Protocol version 6)

    Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6) is a protocol developed as a subset of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to support mobile connections.

  • mobile printing

    Mobile printing is the process of sending data to a printer wirelessly from a smartphone or tablet.

  • mobile satellite services (MSS)

    Mobile satellite services (MSS) refers to networks of communications satellites intended for use with mobile and portable wireless telephones.

  • Mobile service provider

    A mobile service provider (MSP) is a company that offers mobile communication services to users of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs.

  • mobile workforce management (MWM)

    Mobile workforce management (MWM) is a category of software and related services used to manage employees working outside the company premises; the term is often used in reference to field teams.

  • mobility agent

    In Mobile Internet Protocol (Mobile IP), a mobility agent is a router that facilitates Internet traffic forwarding for a mobile node when its location is changed to somewhere other than its home network.

  • Mobitex

    Mobitex is a wireless network architecture that specifies a framework for the fixed equipment necessary to support all the wireless terminals in a packet-switched, radio-based communication system.

  • Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS)

    Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) - sometimes called Multimedia Messaging System - is a communications technology developed by 3GPP (Third Generation Partnership Project) that allows users to exchange multimedia communications between capable mobile phones and other devices.

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