Applications and infrastructure Definitions

Search Definitions
  • #

    4G (fourth-generation wireless)

    4G is the short term for fourth-generation wireless, the stage of broadband mobile communications that will supercede the third generation (3G) of wireless communications....(Continued)

  • 802.11

    802.11 is an evolving family of specifications for wireless local area networks (WLANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)....(Continued)

  • 802.11b

    The 802.11b standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) - often called Wi-Fi - is part of the 802.11 series of WLAN standards from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • 802.11d

    802.11d is a communications specification for use in countries where systems using other standards in the 802.11 family are not allowed to operate.

  • 802.11e

    802.11e is a proposed enhancement to the 802.11a and 802.11b wireless LAN (WLAN) specifications.

  • 802.11g

    The 802.11g specification is a standard for wireless local area networks WLANs) that offers wireless transmission over relatively short distances at up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps), compared with the 11 Mbps theoretical maximum with the earlier 802.11b standard.

  • 802.11h

    The 802.11h specification is an addition to the 802.11 family of standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs). 802.11h is intended to resolve interference issues introduced by the use of 802.11a in some locations, particularly with military radar systems.

  • 802.11i

    802.11i is a standard for wireless local area networks (WLANs) that provides improved encryption for networks that use the popular 802.11a and 802.11b (which includes Wi-Fi standards).

  • 802.11j

    The 802.11j specification is a proposed addition to the 802.11 family of standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs) that incorporates Japenese regulatory extensions to the 802.11a standard.

  • 802.11k

    802.11k is a proposed standard for a series of measurement requests and reports involving channel selection, roaming, transmit power control (TPC), and subscriber statistics in 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs).

  • 802.11m

    802.11m is an initiative to perform editorial maintenance, corrections, improvements, clarifications, and interpretations relevant to documentation for 802.11 family specifications.

  • 802.11n

    802.11n is an addition to the 802.11 family of standards. The goal of 802.11n is to increase wireless local area network (WLAN) speed, improve reliability and extend the range of wireless transmissions. 802.11n uses multiple input / multiple output (MIMO) technology and a wider radio frequency channel.

  • 802.11x

    802.11x refers to a group of evolving wireless local area network (WLAN) standards that are under development as elements of the IEEE 802.11 family of specifications, but that have not yet been formally approved or deployed.

  • 802.15

    802.15 is a communications specification that was approved in early 2002 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) for wireless personal area networks (WPANs).

  • 802.16

    802.16 is a group of broadband wireless communications standards for metropolitan area networks (MANs) developed by a working group of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • 802.16a

    802.16a is a wireless communications specification for metropolitan area networks (MANs).

  • 802.16c

    802.16c is a set of clarifications and updates to the 102.16 family of wireless communications specifications for metropolitan area networks (MANs).

  • 802.1X

    The 802.1X standard is designed to enhance the security of wireless local area networks (WLANs) that follow the IEEE 802.11 standard.

  • A

    Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP)

    Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) is an interface specification that enables 3-D graphics to display quickly on ordinary personal computers.

  • Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS)

    Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) is a standard system for analog signal cellular telephone service in the United States and is also used in other countries. It is based on the initial electromagnetic radiation spectrum allocation for cellular service by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1970. Introduced by AT&T in 1983, AMPS became one of the most widely deployed cellular system in the United States. (Continued...)

  • air interface

    In cellular telephone communications, the air interface is the radio-frequency portion of the circuit between the cellular phone set or wireless modem (usually portable or mobile) and the active base station.

  • Airborne Internet (A.I.)

    The Airborne Internet is a proposed network intended for use in aviation communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS).

  • Alpha TransForm (Alpha Software)

    Alpha TransForm is a mobile app development and deployment platform that allows developers and individuals to build and deploy mobile apps that can be integrated into enterprise workflows.

  • amateur radio (ham radio)

    Amateur radio, also known as ham radio, is a hobby enjoyed by several hundred thousand people in the United States and by over a million people worldwide.

  • Amazon Cloud Drive

    Amazon Cloud Drive is an online storage service that allows users to upload and access music, videos, documents and photos from Web-connected devices.

  • American Radio Relay League (ARRL)

    The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is a worldwide organization of amateur radio operators with its headquarters in Newington, Connecticut, USA. The organization was founded in 1914 by Hiram P. Maxim.

  • Android Beam

    Android Beam is a Near Field Communication implementation that allows two Android mobile devices to transfer data between each other.

  • Android Studio

    Android Studio is the official integrated development environment (IDE) for Android application development.

  • antenna

    An antenna is a specialized transducer that converts radio-frequency (RF) fields into alternating current (AC) or vice-versa.

  • app

    App is an abbreviated form of the word "application."  An application is a software program.

  • app refactoring (application refactoring)

    restructuring existing computer code / reformatting and optimizing desktop apps for mobile / improving software coding and design without changing its intended functions.

  • app store (application store)

    An app store (application store) is an online portal through which software programs are made available for procurement and download.

  • app wrapping (application wrapping)

    App wrapping is the process of applying a management layer to a mobile app without requiring any changes to the underlying application.

  • AppBlast (Project AppBlast)

    AppBlast is a VMware initiative that allows users to access their Windows and Mac applications from any device running an HTML 5 browser.

  • Apple Bonjour

    Apple Bonjour is a group of networking technologies designed to help devices and applications discover each other on the same network.

  • Apple Pay

    Apple Pay is a contactless mobile financial transactions service developed for Apple devices.

  • Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT)

    Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT) is a set of freely downloadable program utilities and related documents from Microsoft for ensuring compatibility among application programs in Windows operating systems, especially in a large network environment.

  • application sandboxing

    Application sandboxing, also called application containerization, is an approach to software development and mobile application management (MAM) that limits the environments in which certain code can execute.

  • Aruba's Mobile Virtual Enterprise (MOVE)

    Aruba’s Mobile Virtual Enterprise (MOVE) is a network architecture that provides a unified process for wired, wireless and remote access for users on both company-owned and employee-owned devices.

  • Asia Cellular Satellite System (ACeS)

    Asia Cellular Satellite System(ACeS) is a combined cellular telephone and satellite wireless system from Ericsson that provides digital communication service to mobile phone and computer users in the Asia Pacific Region.

  • automated speech recognition (ASR)

    Automated speech recognition (ASR) is a technology that allows users of information systems to speak entries rather than punching numbers on a keypad.

  • AWS Device Farm

    AWS Device Farm is an Amazon Web Services (AWS) mobile app testing service for Android or Fire OS-based devices.

  • wireless access point

    A wireless access point (wireless AP) is a network device that transmits and receives data over a wireless local area network (WLAN). Typically, wireless routers are used in homes and small businesses where all users can be supported by one combined AP and router.

  • B

    battery

    A battery is an electrochemical cell (or enclosed and protected material) that can be charged electrically to provide a static potential for power or released electrical charge when needed.

  • beaming

    In infrared transmission, beaming is the communication of data between wireless devices using a beam of infrared light.

  • BitPim

    BitPim is a cross-platform, open source application for managing data on cell phones that use the CDMA mobile telephony protocol. BitPim can be used to back up data stored on a phone and synchronize contacts and calendars... (Continued)

  • Bluetooth

    Bluetooth technology allows computers, mobile devices and accessories to easily interconnect with each other. A Bluetooth connection is wireless and works over a short range.

  • Bluetooth 4.0

    Bluetooth 4.0 is a version of the Bluetooth wireless networking standard that consumes less power than its predecessors.

  • Box (Box.net)

    Box is an online file-sharing, storage and collaboration service provider that caters to individual users as well as businesses.

  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless)

    BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.

  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP)

    The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas. BTOP, which will disburse $4.7 billion in a number of categories, is expected to create jobs, advance technology and boost the economy.

  • C

    cam

    A cam, homecam, or Webcam is a video camera, usually attached directly to a computer, whose current or latest image is requestable from a Web site.

  • captive portal

    A captive portal is a Web page that the user of a public-access network is obliged to view and interact with before access is granted. Captive portals are typically used by business centers, airports, hotel lobbies, coffee shops, and other venues that offer free Wi-Fi hot spots for Internet users.

  • CDMA One (cdmaOne or code-division multiple access one)

    Also see CDMA, WCDMA, and CDMA2000. CDMA One, also written cdmaOne, refers to the original ITU IS-95 (CDMA) wireless interface protocol that was first standardized in 1993. It is considered a second-generation (2G) mobile wireless technology.

  • CDMA2000 (IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or code-division multiple access 2000)

    CDMA2000, also known as IMT-CDMA Multi-Carrier or 1xRTT, is a code-division multiple access (CDMA) version of the IMT-2000 standard developed by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

  • cell

    In wireless telephony, a cell is the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter.

  • cell breathing

    Cell breathing is the constant change of the range of the geographical area covered by a cellular telephone transmitter based on the amount of traffic currently using that transmitter.

  • Cell of Origin (COO)

    Cell of Origin (COO) is a mobile positioning technique for finding a caller's cell (the basic geographical coverage unit of a cellular telephone system) location.

  • Citrix Worx

    Citrix Worx is a line of certified mobile applications for the enterprise. Security, policy and provisioning for Worx apps are controlled by Citrix XenMobile.

  • CloudOn

    CloudOn is a web-based collaboration tool that allows users to open, review and edit Microsoft Office documents on any computing device that has a Google Chrome or Apple Safari browser.

  • coaxial antenna

    A coaxial antenna is a variant of the dipole antenna, designed for use with an unbalanced feed line.

  • common short code (CSC)

    Common short codes (CSC) are short telephone numbers, usually consisting of five digits, that are used to address SMS and MMS messages from cellular telephones. Common short codes may also be called mobile short codes or short numbers... (Continued)

  • Compact HTML (CHTML)

    Compact HTML (CHTML or cHTML) is a subset of standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) adapted for use with small computing devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), cellular phones, and smartphones.

  • Complementary Code Keying (CCK)

    Complementary Code Keying (CCK) is a modulation scheme used with wireless networks (WLANs) that employ the IEEE 802.11b specification.

  • cross-platform mobile development

    Cross-platform mobile development is the creation of software applications that are compatible with multiple mobile operating systems.

  • CSD (circuit switched data)

    Circuit switched data (CSD) was the original form of data transmission developed for TDMA-based networks, typically obtaining speeds up to 9.6 Kbps.

  • CYOD (choose your own device)

    CYOD (choose your own device) is an alternative model to BYOD (bring your own device) that involves allowing employees to select the device they want from among a limited number of options. CYOD is an example of the COPE (corporate-owned, personally-enabled) model.

  • D

    D-AMPS (Digital-Advanced Mobile Phone Service)

    D-AMPS (Digital-Advanced Mobile Phone Service), sometimes spelled DAMPS, is a digital version of AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone Service), the original analog standard for cellular telephone phone service in the United States.

  • datacard

    A datacard is any removable computer component, approximately the size of a credit card, that contains data, or that contains nonvolatile memory to which data can be written and from which data can be recovered.

  • decibels related to dipole antenna (dBd)

    dBd (decibels related to dipole antenna) is a measure of the gain of an antenna system relative to a dipole antenna at radio frequency.

  • Deep Space Network (DSN)

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is a sophisticateddata communications system used by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in conjunction with manned and unmanned space missions.

  • device-agnostic (device agnosticism)

    Device agnostic is a description for computing components that work with various systems without requiring any special adaptations. 

  • digital audio broadcasting (DAB)

  • digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB)

    Digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB) is the process of multicasting by satellite or terrestrial services (or a combination of both) for reception by mobile and portable devices, particularly cell phones... (Continued)

  • Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB)

    Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a set of standards that define digital broadcasting using existing satellite, cable, and terrestrial infrastructures.

  • dipole antenna

    A dipole antenna is a straight electrical conductor measuring 1/2 wavelength from end to end and connected at the center to a radio-frequency (RF) feed line.

  • direct broadcast satellite (DBS)

    Direct broadcast satellite (DBS) refers to satellite television (TV) systems in which the subscribers, or end users, receive signals directly from geostationary satellites.

  • dish antenna

    A dish antenna, also known simply as a dish, is common in microwave systems.

  • distributed antenna system (DAS)

    A distributed antenna system (DAS) is a way to deal with isolated spots of poor coverage inside a large building by installing a network of relatively small antennas throughout the building to serve as repeaters.

  • downlink and uplink

    These terms should not be confused with downstream and upstream.

  • Dropbox

    Dropbox is a cloud storage provider (sometimes referred to as an online backup service) that is frequently used as a file-sharing service.

  • E

    EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment)

    EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment) is a faster version of GSM designed to deliver data at rates up to 384 Kbps and enable the delivery of multimedia and other broadband applications to mobile phone and computer users.

  • EFSS (Enterprise file sync-and-share)

    Enterprise file sync-and-share is a service that allows users to save files in cloud or on-premises storage and then access them on desktop and mobile devices.

  • electromagnetic interference (EMI)

    EMI (electromagnetic interference) is the disruption of operation of an electronic device when it is in the vicinity of an electromagnetic field (EM field) in the radio frequency (RF) spectrum that is caused by another electronic device.

  • end-user computing (EUC)

    End-user computing (EUC) refers to the devices, applications and data that workers need to perform their jobs, and the technologies used to deploy, manage and secure those resources.

  • Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS)

    Enhanced Messaging Service (EMS) is an adaptation of the Short Message Service (SMS) that allows users to send and receive ring tones and operator logos, as well as combinations of simple media to and from EMS-compliant handsets.

  • enterprise app store (enterprise application store)

    An enterprise app store is a web portal through which end users can access, download and install corporate-approved software applications.

  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI)

    Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks... (Continued)

  • ESMR (Enhanced Specialized Mobile Radio)

    Also see Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR).

  • EUTELSAT (European Telecommunications Satellite Organization)

    EUTELSAT (European Telecommunications Satellite Organization) refers to both the organization and its set of satellites that were placed in geostationary orbits over Europe beginning in 1983. By early 1998, at least 48 countries had become members of EUTELSAT and the satellites were serving both public and private traffic, including telephone services, fax, data, land mobile service, and television and radio programming to home and business users with their own receivers.

  • EV-DO (1x Evolution-Data Optimized)

    1x Evolution-Data Optimized, (EV-DO) is a 3G wireless radio broadband data standard. (...Continued)

  • Evernote

    Evernote is a cloud-based note-taking and file-storage application that synchronizes data across multiple devices.

  • F

    FDMA (frequency division multiple access)

  • feed line

    In a wireless communications or broadcasting antenna system, the feed line connects the antenna to the receiver, transmitter, or transceiver.

  • file sharing

    File sharing is the public or private sharing of computer data or space in a network with various levels of access privilege.

  • fixed wireless

    Fixed wireless refers to the operation of wireless devices or systems in fixed locations such as homes and offices.

  • fixed-mobile convergence (FMC)

    Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) is the trend towards seamless connectivity between fixed and wireless telecommunications networks... (Continued)

  • fixed-mobile substitution (FMS)

    Fixed-mobile substitution (FMS) is the tendency for consumers and businesses to increasingly substitute cellular telephones for hard-wired or cordless landline sets... (Continued)

  • flash mob

    A flash mob is a group of strangers who organize themselves, using electronic media such as cell phones or the Internet, to gather together in a public place, behave in a predetermined (and often silly) manner for a predetermined amount of time, and then quickly disperse... (Continued)

  • FlashMob supercomputer

    A FlashMob supercomputer is a group of computer enthusiasts who gather together in one physical location for a brief time period in order to function as a supercomputer and work on a single problem.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchNetworking

SearchUnifiedCommunications

SearchSecurity

Close