Definition

modem

A modem modulates outgoing digital signals from a computer or other digital device to analog signals for a conventional copper twisted pair telephone line and demodulates the incoming analog signal and converts it to a digital signal for the digital device.

In recent years, the 2400 bits per second modem that could carry e-mail has become obsolete. 14.4 Kbps and 28.8 Kbps modems were temporary landing places on the way to the much higher bandwidth devices and carriers of tomorrow. From early 1998, most new personal computers came with 56 Kbps modems. By comparison, using a digital Integrated Services Digital Network adapter instead of a conventional modem, the same telephone wire can now carry up to 128 Kbps. With Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) systems, now being deployed in a number of communities, bandwidth on twisted-pair can be in the megabit range.

This was last updated in November 2006

Continue Reading About modem

Dig Deeper on Mobile networking

PRO+

Content

Find more PRO+ content and other member only offers, here.

Join the conversation

1 comment

Send me notifications when other members comment.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Please create a username to comment.

Oh, it also makes those beautiful sounds on connection! In some models there were no way to turn down or mute the sound. And because early in the days best connection was during the night you can imagine happiness of the neighbors.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchNetworking

SearchTelecom

SearchUnifiedCommunications

SearchSecurity

Close