Definition

GSM (Global System for Mobile communication)

GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) is a digital mobile telephony system that is widely used in Europe and other parts of the world. GSM uses a variation of time division multiple access (TDMA) and is the most widely used of the three digital wireless telephony technologies (TDMA, GSM, and CDMA). GSM digitizes and compresses data, then sends it down a channel with two other streams of user data, each in its own time slot. It operates at either the 900 MHz or 1800 MHz frequency band.

Mobile services based on GSM technology were first launched in Finland in 1991. Today, more than 690 mobile networks provide GSM services across 213 countries and GSM represents 82.4% of all global mobile connections. According to GSM World, there are now more than 2 billion GSM mobile phone users worldwide. GSM World references China as "the largest single GSM market, with more than 370 million users, followed by Russia with 145 million, India with 83 million and the USA with 78 million users."

Since many GSM network operators have roaming agreements with foreign operators, users can often continue to use their mobile phones when they travel to other countries. SIM cards (Subscriber Identity Module) holding home network access configurations may be switched to those will metered local access, significantly reducing roaming costs while experiencing no reductions in service.

GSM, together with other technologies, is part of the evolution of wireless mobile telemmunications that includes High-Speed Circuit-Switched Data (HSCSD), General Packet Radio System (GPRS), Enhanced Data GSM Environment (EDGE), and Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS).

This was last updated in May 2007
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Email Alerts

Register now to receive SearchMobileComputing.com-related news, tips and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

More News and Tutorials

  • Making the call: Distributed antenna systems and in-building wireless

    Distributed antenna systems and in-building wireless solutions are two options to improve wireless cellular coverage within an enterprise facility.

  • Femtocell solutions: Key questions to ask before you invest

    Femtocells are all the rage, and these tiny cellular radios promise to improve in-building cellular coverage and are primarily targeted at the home-user. However, some vendors are now building enterprise femtocell solutions. Should you consider femtocell deployment in order to improve your cellular coverage? This article identifies the key questions you should ask before you buy a femtocell solution.

  • The benefits of dual-mode fixed mobile convergence

    Dual-mode fixed mobile convergence (FMC) solutions promise to reduce voice communication costs and improve employee productivity. But enterprises have yet to deploy them widely. This article analyzes the potential benefits of dual-mode FMC solutions.

Do you have something to add to this definition? Let us know.

Send your comments to techterms@whatis.com

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: